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LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA ANTHONY COLLINS SIBELIUS LP VINYL NEW 33RPM

LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA ANTHONY COLLINS SIBELIUS LP VINYL NEW 33RPM

Regular price £108.99 Sale

Tracklisting

LP 1 – Sibelius Symphony No. 1
LP 2 – Sibelius Symphony No. 2
LP 3 – Sibelius Symphony No. 3 & 7
LP 4 – Sibelius Symphony No. 4
LP 5 – Sibelius Symphony No. 5
LP 6 – Sibelius Symphony No. 6
The London Symphony Orchestra / Anthony Collins

Recorded between 1952 and 1955, these ‘ffrr’ recordings from the Mono era represent the first complete collection of the Sibelius symphonies. The project was initiated by Victor Olof, a legendary Decca producer, who had the foresight to select one of the prominent conductors of the past century, Anthony Collins.

Notably, this is not only the first complete Sibelius cycle, but also one of the very few recording projects consulted with the composer himself. Before the beginning of the project, Collins sought the composer's advice and in response to a lengthy telegram of detailed questions received in reply: "Conductor must have liberty to get performance living."

Due in equal parts to the transparency and depth of Decca’s "ffrr" (full frequency range recording) technique, and the precision and excellence of the London Symphony's playing, Collins’ recordings reveal the sheer wonder of the scores' shifting textures that prior recordings couldn't capture.

Combined with Collins' sense of excitement and inspiration, these recordings form a set of historical significance that has stood the test of time.

The Lacquers were created by Sean Magee at Abbey Road Studios. Transfers were made from original Mono tapes. High-quality 180gm pressings from OPTIMAL.

-Lift-off lid box
-New notes by Sibelius specialist Robert Layton
-Numbered Limited 6LP Edition

"Collins had made his name composing scores for the RKO studios, earning three Oscar nominations, before Victor Olof invited him to record with the London Symphony Orchestra. The result was a Sibelius cycle that is yet to be bettered." The Sunday Telegraph, 2009